Posts tagged ‘The Seeker Wine’

Cliffs Wine Picks – The Seeker and a Photo Contest

 

This is based on samples provided by the winery or another company acting on their behalf.

 

 

2012 The Seeker Pinot Grigio

2012 The Seeker Riesling

2012 The Seeker Rosé

2012 The Seeker Red Blend

 

All wines have a suggested retail price of $10 to $15.

 

 

 

I was given the opportunity to sample some new wines from The Seeker.  Earlier I had the opportunity to sample some other wines from them.  My write up on those wines is available here.

 

 

This group of wines is perfect to enjoy during the warmer weather this Summer with lighter meals on the deck or patio or to share with friends on a warm evening over good conversation.

 

 

 

Winery Information (winery supplied)

Do you have a taste for risk, a curious nature, and a daring spirit?  Then come, join The Seeker on a singular wine adventure!  The Seeker is a lively line of wines from all over the world.  Our wanderings yielded distinct wines from disparate lands, delighting the senses on a global taste journey.  It is a carefully curated collection of the best wines from where they grow best, each wine lovingly crafted by a different family winery.

 

For The Seeker, it’s all about the journey.  Simply glance at the labels and you’ll see; the mid-19th century flying machines embody an era of wonder and mystery, of explorers out to conquer the known world… and beyond.  The Seeker speaks to the unknown, the unknowable, and the thrill of discovery. Cheers!

 

The Seeker Wines were created by a family company that called on its 65+ years of experience to source from the best family-owned wineries in the world at an affordable price.  With a dedication to reducing our carbon footprint, The Seeker Wines extends our eco-friendly philosophy from our immediate family to our global family.  So whether by land, sea, or air, take flight with us and seek more information at http://theseekerwines.com

 

The line up for this tasting:

The Seeker lineup

 

2012 The Seeker Pinot Grigio (Italy, Veneto)

This is 100% Pinot Grigio from the Veneto region in Italy.  The wine was aged in stainless steel tanks on light lees.  This unoaked wine did not undergo malolactic fermentation to retain the fresh acidity and to maintain the varietal character.

 

The final alcohol in the wine is 12.5%.

 

My Tasting Note

The wine is a very light yellow color with a slight green tint.  The crisp and refreshing nose has apples, lemon zest, pears, minerals, orange blossoms, and a touch of spice.  This has light to medium body, citrusy acidity, and has just a touch of sweetness.  On the palate the bright, juicy fruit is joined by a touch of almond before the mouthwatering citrus kicks in.  The finish has nice length and closes on a slightly sweet pear/citrus note.  (87 pts)

 

This easy drinking Pinot Grigio would be a fine partner with just about any lighter, warm weather dish.  I think this would shine if served with some grilled shrimp.  This has more body and depth than your typical Italian Pinot Grigio.

Seeker Pinot Grigio

 

 

 

2012 The Seeker Riesling (Germany, Mosel Saar Ruwer)

This is 100% hand harvested Riesling is from the Trittenheim and Piesport Vineyards in the Mosel region in Germany.  The wine was fermented in stainless steel and oak casks.  The wine was aged 3 to 8 months in a mix of stainless steel and oak casks.

 

The final alcohol in the wine is 8.5%.

 

My Tasting Note

The wine is a bright yellow color with a slight green tint.  The slightly shy nose eventually shows honey dipped apples, pineapple, white pepper, minerals, and a very faint petrol note.  This has medium body, crisp acidity, and nice residual sweetness.  On the palate this has tart apples, honey, and crisp citrus with nice sweetness coming in on the back end.  The finish has very nice length and closes with a sweet note.  The sweetness and acidity are very nicely balanced.  (91 pts)

 

This would excel if paired with a spicy Asian dish.  I love an off dry Riesling with spicy Cajun food and this would be outstanding with seafood gumbo.  This would also be a nice glass of wine to sip on a warm evening over good conversation with friends.

Seeker Riesling

 

 

 

2012 The Seeker Rosé (France, Provence)

This is a blend of 50% Grenache and 50% Cinsault from vineyards in the AOC Côtes de Provence.  The grape varieties were vinified separately before blending.  The wine was aged in tanks (no oak).

 

The final alcohol in the wine is 12.5%.

 

My Tasting Note

The wine is a very nice pink salmon color.  The inviting nose has watermelon, white peach, minerals, red raspberries, orange zest, a touch of spice, and a slightly salty sea breeze element.  This has light to medium body, with good acidity, and is dry.  On the palate the fruit steps to the forefront with spice and building minerality supporting the back end.  The finish has nice length and closes on a distinct mineral note with just a touch of sweetness from the red fruit.  (89 pts)

 

This dry Rosé would pair very nicely with a mixed greens salad with a light berry infused vinaigrette dressing.  This would also drink very nicely on its own on a warm Summer day.

Seeker Rose

 

 

 

2012 The Seeker Red Blend (Chile, Central Valley)

This is a blend of 50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Merlot, and 25% Syrah from vineyards in the Maipo and Colchagua Valleys in Chile.  Half of the wine was aged in stainless steel tanks; the remaining 50% was aged for 6 months in a mix of 60% American and 40% French oak barrels with 25% being new.

 

The final alcohol in the wine is 13.5%.

 

My Tasting Note

The wine is a bright ruby red color.  The nose has blackberries, plums, vanilla, dill, black pepper, cherry, and some earthiness.  This has medium body, soft to moderate tannins, and slightly soft acidity.  On the palate the dark fruit and earthiness take center stage with vanilla and the dill coming in late.  The finish has decent length but gets a touch muddled and earthy as it warms up.  I would recommend giving this a slight chill.  (85 pts)

 

This needs some juicy meat hot off the grill or some fairly hearty appetizers.

Seeker Chilean Red Blend

 

 

 

Closing thoughts

On the whole, I think these are all very drinkable, reasonably priced wines that would work with warm weather food or stand on their own as a cocktail wine.  The Seeker is unique in that they source their wines from the part of the world where that varietal calls home.

 

Photo Contest

start

Want to win a great new camera to help you capture memories when you SEEK out new adventures?

 

The seeker is giving away a new La Sardina Camera and Flash Belle Star with 35mm film.  All you have to do to enter is submit your most disappointing picture and if your entry is selected, The Seeker will help you avoid future disappointments.

 

Click here for more information.

 

Good Luck, I hope one of my readers wins the contest.

seeker_marquee_image1

Connect with The Seeker Wines

You can connect with The Seeker on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, or Foodspotting by clicking on the social media channel of your choice.

 

 

 

Connect with me

 

You can follow me on Twitter for more wine info, potential food pairings, and an occasional recipe or two.  Be warned, I’m also a sports fan and there are occasional Pittsburgh Penguins, Steelers, and Pirates tweets.  I attended the University of South Carolina, so during football season, there will also be some Gamecock posts.

 

If you like this post, consider joining Cliffs Wine Picks Wine Blog on Facebook and giving me a Like.

 

Cheers!

 

 

This is original to CliffsWinePicks.com.  Copyright 2013 Cliff’s Wine Picks.

All rights reserved.

 

 

 

***** Shameless Self Promotion *****

 

Here is a link to a YouTube video of me getting “coal” from Santa for being named the “Nicest Person in Social Media” in 2012.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOvQTeGR3-c

 

 

 

Breaking news from Klout:

Klout

 

 

Remember to support your local wine store!

 

 

 

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Notes – I use the “official” Cellar Tracker name for the wines.  I use Cellar Tracker to help manage and organize my cellar.  I highly recommend checking it out at www.cellartracker.com.  Loading you existing cellar is a lot less intimidating than it would first appear.  There is a good chance 99% of your wine is already in the system, so you generally only need to enter part of the wine’s name and the system will find it for you.

 

 

Prices noted are the prices I paid at the time of purchase.  I don’t shop around to find the best prices, but my local store is usually VERY competitive.  I generally get case discounts, and since I work there part time, I get a 5% discount.  Wines purchased direct from a winery do not include any shipping charges.  None of the prices include the sales tax.

 

 

All wines that were sent to me free of charge to sample will be noted and I will show suggested prices when available.

 

 

 

Cheers!

 

The Seeker Wines – Around the World in a bottle

 

 

 

These reviews are based on samples provided by the winery or an organization acting on their behalf.

 

 

 

Winery Information  (winery supplied)

The Seeker Wines is a new line of carefully curated wines created for those who love to seek adventure.  Our wanderings yielded five unique varietals– a California Chardonnay, New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc, French Pinot Noir, Argentine Malbec, and Chilean Cabernet Sauvignon, each sourced from top-quality wineries celebrated for their excellence and dedication to sustainable practices and local printing.  Whether roaming far-off lands or exploring Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter, The Seeker delights the senses on a global taste journey.  Just glance at the labels and you’ll see mid-19th century flying machines that beckon a bygone era of wonder and mystery that reminds us why exploring the unknown world is all about the journey.

 

The Seeker Wines were created by a family company that called on its 65+ years of experience to source from the best family-owned wineries in the world at an affordable price.  With a dedication to reducing our carbon footprint, The Seeker Wines extends our eco-friendly philosophy from our immediate family to our global family.  So whether by land, sea, or air, take flight with us and seek more information at http://theseekerwines.com

 

 

 

 

All wines have a suggested retail price of $10 to $15.

 

 

 

 

All wines were sampled over most of an evening.  This allowed me to capture each wine when it was at its peak.

 

 

 

 

 

2010 The Seeker Chardonnay

 

 

My comments

The wine is 97% Chardonnay with 3% Gewürztraminer.  The grapes were sourced from cool climate vineyards in California.

 

The wine has 13.8% alcohol and was aged in tank on light lees with no oak.  A small portion under went malolactic fermentation, which adds a bit of creaminess and body to the wine.

 

This wine was produced in a state of the art, family owned winery utilizing solar and water conservation technology.

 

 

My Tasting Note

The wine is a light yellow to straw color.  The fresh nose features apples, pears, pineapples, lemon zest, minerals, fresh flowers, and spices.  This has medium body with decent acidity.  On the palate, the wine is fairly creamy and rich with the apples and pears upfront and pineapple and spices in the background.  On the backend, the wine turns a bit flat and loses a bit of focus.  On the finish a bit of citrusy acidity attempts to pull the wine back into focus and generally succeeds.  A slight herbal note lingers on the finish that could be useful in pairing the wine with food.  I would serve this well chilled to help preserve the acidity on the backend.  I think this would work well with a cool chicken salad with a bit of tarragon added just before serving.  (85 pts)

 

 

 

2011 The Seeker Sauvignon Blanc

 

 

My comments

The wine is 100% Sauvignon Blanc which was sourced from both Marlborough on the south island and Martinborough on the north island.

 

The wine has 12.7% alcohol and was aged 2 months in tank on light lees. After the aging, the lots were blended then gently fined and filtered before bottling.

 

 

My Tasting Note

The wine is a very light, clear, yellowish straw color.  The exotic, unusual, and appealing nose features musk laden apples, mint, lime, white pepper, saline minerality, and orange blossoms.  The wine has light body and features crisp, citrusy acidity.  On the palate the sweet, minty apples and spice get a boost when the lime kicks in.  The finish is fairly long with the saline laced minerals adding nice complexity.  This would be perfect with a relaxing dinner on the patio or deck with some grilled shellfish or a salad.  My vote would be to serve this with a shrimp salad served on a delicate, flaky croissant.  (90 pts)

 

 

 

2011 The Seeker Pinot Noir

 

 

My comments

The wine is 100% Pinot Noir from vineyard sites in Auvergne.  The vineyards are on rich volcanic soils 350-500 meters above sea level.  The vines range in age from 15 to 40 years old.

 

The wine has an alcohol of 13.5% and was aged in tank on light lees with no oak.

 

 

My Tasting Note

The wine is a light, clear, ruby red color.  The light and fresh nose features cherries, Asian spices, raspberry, and some soft earthiness.  This is medium body, at most, with ripe tannins and very nice acidity.  On the palate the wine shows spicy, red fruit with a slowly building earthy element.  The finish is more on the earthy side with the red fruit and spice more in the background.  In my opinion, this was much better with some air.  The wine initially had candied red fruit front and center which was a bit distracting.  With the air the candied elements dissipated allowing the spice and earthiness to come through.  This would work well with chicken and pork dishes and may hold up well to a rich, creamy pasta dish.  My vote would be to give the wine an hour of air and serve with Fettuccine Alfredo with some sliced grilled chicken.   (87 pts)

 

 

 

2011 The Seeker Cabernet Sauvignon

 

 

My comments

The wine is 100% Cabernet Sauvignon from vineyards in both the Maipo and Colchagua Valleys.  The vineyards are 17 years old and planted in clay and alluvial soils.

 

The wine has an alcohol level of 13.5%.  The wine was aged 5 months in 20% new oak.  The oak was 50% American and 50% French.

 

 

My Tasting Note

The wine is a medium ruby color.  The deep and dark nose features cassis, dark roasted coffee beans, smoke, dark chocolate, spices, dried herbs, vanilla, and some subtle earthiness.  This has medium body with fairly solid tannins and very nice acidity.  The upfront spicy and earthy cassis hits the palate first followed by some nice dark roast coffee and dark chocolate.  On the backend, as the fruit fades the earthiness takes over with a bit of dried herbs.  The finish has decent length but could use a touch more fleshiness.  This would be nice with a pot roast or beef stew.  My vote would be to serve with a medium rare sirloin steak that was seared to a nice charred exterior.  (88 pts)

 

 

 

2010 The Seeker Malbec

 

 

My comments

The wine is 85% Malbec with 10% Bonarda and 5% Cabernet Sauvignon.  The vineyards are Agrelo and Vistaflores in Lujan de Cuyo.

 

The wine has 14.5% alcohol and was aged for one year in French oak and a minimum of two months in bottle before release.

 

 

My Tasting Note

The wine is a deep, dark ruby to maroon color.  The very open and inviting nose features cherries, blackberries, licorice, Asian spices, earthy underbrush, mocha, and some violets.  This is medium to full bodied with fairly solid, ripe tannins and nice acidity.  On the palate the wine leads off with the spicy cherries and berries but the building mocha and earthy elements soon take center stage.  The earthy, dark chocolate flavors continue right through the finish, which has nice length.  This greatly improved with an hour of air, which helped it to add some weight and fill out the finish.  Serve this with something hot off the grill.  My recommendation would be a skirt steak with a bit of fine ground espresso added to the meat before a few minutes on a very hot grill.  (88 pts)

 

 

 

Contact information

 

More information can be found on the winery’s website at http://theseekerwines.com

 

You can follow the winery on Twitter at http://twitter.com/theseekerwines or check them out on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/theseekerwines

 

 

 

 

 

Remember to support your local wine store!

 

 

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

Notes – I use the “official” Cellar Tracker name for the wines.  I use Cellar Tracker to help manage and organize my cellar.  I highly recommend checking it out at www.cellartracker.com.  Loading you existing cellar is a lot less intimidating than it would first appear.  There is a good chance 99% of your wine is already in the system, so you generally only need to enter part of the wine’s name and the system will find it for you.

 

 

Prices noted are the prices I paid at the time of purchase.  I don’t shop around to find the best prices, but my local store is usually VERY competitive.  I generally get case discounts, and since I work there part time, I get a 5% discount.  Wines purchased direct from a winery do not include any shipping charges.  None of the prices include the sales tax.

 

 

All wines that were sent to me free of charge to sample will be noted and I will show suggested prices when available.

 

 

 

Cheers!

 

Oct 15, 2012 to Oct 18, 2012

 

 

 

2007 Ridge Geyserville – $26.59

 

My comments

I’d be hard pressed to pick my favorite Zinfandel based blend coming out of California between Ridge’s Geyserville and their Lytton Springs.  These are both wines that taste pretty good upon release, but transform into something magical with some cellar time.  These are generally not the type of zins that grab you by the throat and club you over the head.  These are much more refined and elegant.

 

Winery history

The history of Ridge Vineyards begins in 1885, when Osea Perrone, a doctor who became a prominent member of San Francisco’s Italian community, bought 180 acres near the top of Monte Bello Ridge. He terraced the slopes and planted vineyards; using native limestone, he constructed the Monte Bello Winery, producing the first vintage under that name in 1892. This unique cellar, built into the mountainside on three levels, is Ridge’s production facility. At 2600′, it is surrounded by the “upper vineyard.”

 

In the 1940s, William Short, a theologian, bought the abandoned winery and vineyard just below the Perrone property; he replanted several parcels to cabernet sauvignon in the late 1940s. From these vines — now the “middle vineyard”— new owners Dave Bennion and his three partners, all Stanford Research Institute engineers, made a quarter-barrel of “estate” cabernet. That Monte Bello Cabernet was among California’s finest wines of the era. Its quality and distinctive character, and the wines produced from these same vines in 1960 and ’61, convinced the partners to re-bond the winery in time for the 1962 vintage.

 

The first zinfandel was made in 1964, from a small nineteenth-century vineyard farther down the ridge. This was followed in 1966 by the first Geyserville zinfandel. The founding families reclaimed the Monte Bello terraces, increasing vineyard size from fifteen to forty-five acres. Working on weekends, they made wines of regional character and unprecedented intensity. By 1968, production had increased to just under three thousand cases per year, and in 1969, Paul Draper joined the partnership. A Stanford graduate in philosophy—recently returned from setting up a winery in Chile’s coast range—he was a practical winemaker, not an enologist. His knowledge of fine wines and traditional methods complemented the straightforward “hands off” approach pioneered at Ridge. Under his guidance the old Perrone winery (acquired the previous year) was restored, the finest vineyard lands leased or purchased, the consistent quality and international reputation of the wines established. Cabernet and Zinfandel account for most of the production; Syrah, Grenache, Carignane, and Petite Sirah constitute a small percentage. Known primarily for its red wines, Ridge has also made limited amounts of chardonnay since 1962.

 

My Tasting Note

This was decanted for about an hour.  The wine is a deep ruby to maroon color.  The wonderful and fully open nose has brambly berries, freshly cracked black peppercorns, licorice, baking spices, black cherries, with hints of underbrush, vanilla, grilled meat, and just a touch of earthiness.  This has medium body with fairly solid, ripe tannins and very nice acidity.  The finish is fairly long with nice fruit giving way fairly quickly to the more savory elements.  There is a touch of excess oak peeking through towards the end, but it should better integrate with a bit more cellar time.  This is an outstanding Geyserville that will drink nicely through the end of the decade.  (92 pts)

 

 

 

2008 JC Cellars The Impostor – $25.73

 

My comments

This is a blend of  Zinfandel, Syrah, Petite Sirah, Tempranillo, Carignane, Grenache and Viognier.

 

Winery history

Jeff Cohn, the winemaker, president, and “JC” of JC Cellars got his start in the industry almost 20 years ago. As an intern at Boordy Vineyards in Maryland, he drove an hour and half each way to prune vines in frigid weather, pick grapes in stifling heat, and scrub everything from barrels to floors.

 

Long before he began his winemaking career he received an associate degree in culinary arts from Johnson & WalesUniversity, and a bachelor’s degree in hospitality management from FloridaInternationalUniversity.

 

Cohn had always loved the hospitality industry, and as he worked through several high profile positions after college he found his passion for wine steadily growing. The more he learned, the more he wanted to learn, until he realized that becoming a winemaker was his ultimate goal. The job at Boordy was a deciding factor in the trajectory of his career — in spite of all the scrubbing.

 

With the encouragement and support of his family, Cohn moved to California in 1993 to follow his dream. He earned his master’s degree in agriculture chemistry, with an emphasis on enology, from CaliforniaStateUniversity, Fresno in 1996. It was here that Cohn discovered French winemaking techniques and the concept of terroir. “The flavor profile was so different than anything else I had ever tried,” he says of the first Chateauneuf-du-Pape he tried in school. “It was a shocker. To go from tasting only single varietals to a blend really opened my eyes.”

 

For more info, visit http://www.jccellars.com/about-jeff-cohn.html

 

My Tasting Note

The wine is a deep purple color.  The big and bold nose has brambly berries, black pepper, smoked meat, licorice, vanilla, dark chocolate, and violets.  This is fairly full bodied with big, solid tannins and good acidity.  On the palate the juicy, ripe, peppery berries lead the full throttle charge with nice savory elements providing depth and help to balance out the fruit.  The finish has nice length, again with a nice fruit to savory mix.  This is big and ultra ripe, but does not come across as overly alcoholic, sweet, or raisiny.  A very nice and successful balancing act.  (91 pts)

 

 

 

2009 Bedrock Wine Co. Syrah Sonoma Coast – $20.00

 

My comments

To me, Morgan Twain-Peterson from Bedrock is trying to follow playbook written by Mike Officer at Carlisle.  The playbook is fairly simple, offer outstanding, personality filled wine at good prices.  Though relatively new to the game, Bedrock is following the playbook to perfection.  Bedrock has one upped Carlisle in one regard, besides their outstanding red wines, they put out some of the best white wines being produced at reasonable prices in the state.

 

Winery history

Bedrock is an itsy-bitsy winery making wine in a converted chicken coop. Fruit from only the most excellent vineyard sites is hand pitch-forked into the destemmer, fermented in open top redwood and stainless vats using only native yeasts, and are manually basket pressed by winemaker Morgan Twain-Peterson into the sexiest oak from the coldest French forests.

 

The winery’s objectives are:

 

.  To channel the fruit of ancient vines into powerful, elegant, and distinctly Californian wines.

.  To spread the gospel of Syrah in California by sourcing fruit from great terroirs throughout the NorthCoast.

.  To proclaim the greatness of Sonoma Valley Cabernet Sauvignon by sparing no expense on wines of uniqueness and personality.

.  To reclaim rose’ from the excesses of saignee and focus on precision, delicacy, aromatics, and food friendliness.

.  To make fascinating and quixotic white wines from unique sites and interesting varietals.

.  To make California Pinot Noir that ages as well as ’74 Swan.

.  To dream big but keep production low!

 

My Tasting Note

This was decanted for about an hour.  The wine is a deep, dark ruby to purple color.  The very open and inviting nose has blackberries, smoke, charcoal, cocoa powder, grilled meat, black pepper, roasted herbs, leather, and some blueberry.  This is medium to full bodied with sold tannins and very nice acidity.  On the palate the wine shows a big fruit and spice component with grilled meat, dried herbs, dark chocolate, and baking spice adding depth and loads of complexity.  The finish is fairly long and leans heavily on the savory elements with the fruit in the background.  This is still young and evolving but very tasty.  (91 pts)

 

 

 

2004 Palmaz Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon Cedar Knoll Vineyard Co. – $18.21

 

My comments

This wine’s normal price is in the $45 to $49 range, which I feel is WAY too high.  The community average price in CellarTracker for this wine is over $28, which is again pushing the limit.  Luckily I was able to grab half a case for well under $20.  That makes it a good Napa Valley Cab at a price that won’t break the bank when consumed on a week night, especially for an aged Cabernet is in its’ prime drinking window.

 

I’ve had a couple bottles that I liked and rated 89-90 points.

 

Winery history

Cedar Knoll Vineyard and Winery was founded in 1881 by Henry Hagen. One of their wines won a Silver Medal at the Paris Exposition in 1889. At that time, Cedar Knoll was one of Napa’s premier wineries. The winery was a victim of Prohibition and was closed for close to 80 years. Cedar Knoll is now owned by the Palmaz family. They have resurrected the vineyards and restored the original Hagen house. The vineyards occupy 55 acres and are located just northeast of the city of Napa.

 

My Tasting Note

The wine is a fairly deep ruby color, much lighter at the edge.  On the fairly straight forward nose there is cassis, cedar, dried herbs, tobacco, raspberries, smoke and a touch of cherry and leather.  This is medium body with soft, integrated tannins and good acidity.  Nice sweet fruit on the palate with dried herbs and spicy oak coming through on the backend.  Nice length on the finish which shows more of the savory side with the fruit just providing a touch of sweetness.  Drinking nicely now, but I’d probably lean towards drinking over the next year or two before the fruit fades and leaves the oak component as the dominant element.  (89 pts)

 

 

 

Mailing Lists

 

It’s shipping season so most mailing lists have already been completed.

 

 

 

Wines bought or received this week

I received a 5 bottle sampler pack from The Seeker Wines.

 

Set included:

2010 California Chardonnay (unoaked!)

2011 New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc

2011 French Pinot Noir

2010 Argentina Malbec

2011 Chilean Cabernet Sauvignon

 

These will be sampled in the next couple of weeks.  They will be the subject of their own blog posting.  I’m looking forward to giving these a try.

 

 

 

 Remember to support your local wine store!

 

 

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

Notes – I use the “official” Cellar Tracker name for the wines.  I use Cellar Tracker to help manage and organize my cellar.  I highly recommend checking it out at www.cellartracker.com.  Loading you existing cellar is a lot less intimidating than it would first appear.  There is a good chance 99% of your wine is already in the system, so you generally only need to enter part of the wine’s name and the system will find it for you.

 

 

Prices noted are the prices I paid at the time of purchase.  I don’t shop around to find the best prices, but my local store is usually VERY competitive.  I generally get case discounts, and since I work there part time, I get a 5% discount.  Wines purchased direct from a winery do not include any shipping charges.  None of the prices include the sales tax.

 

 

All wines that were sent to me free of charge to sample will be noted and I will show suggested prices when available.

 

 

 

Cheers!

 

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